Veterinary Endorsements

Major veterinary medicine associations encourage state and local government bodies to consider known duration of immunity studies when writing rabies prevention and control laws.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners

“Administration of rabies virus vaccines to cats is subject to inconsistent state and local statutes. In some cases, the requirements fail to consider the duration of protection such vaccines induce; annual administration of rabies vaccines approved for triennial administration is required in many locals. Veterinary organizations should continue to work with state and local governing bodies to ensure that rabies 4 virus vaccine regulations are consistent with the known duration of immunity of available vaccines.” ~ Richards J, 2000 Report of the American Association of Feline Practitioners and the Academy of Feline Medicine Advisory Panel on Feline Vaccines.

American Veterinary Medicine Association Council on Biologic and Therapeutic Agents

“Local and regional regulatory authorities mandate revaccination schedules including some that are more frequent than necessary as demonstrated by scientific evidence." ~Klingborg, Hustead, Curry Galvan, AVMA Council On Biologic and Therapeutic Agent’s report on cat and dog vaccines, JAVMA,Vol 221, No 10, Nov 15, 2002.

American Animal Hospital Association Canine Task Force

“Every effort should be made to change laws that require vaccination with this rabies product more often than every three years since annual vaccinations cannot be shown to increase efficacy and it is known to increase adverse events.” ~ Paul, Michael, Report of the American Animal Hospital Association Canine Vaccine Task Force: 2003 Canine Vaccine Guidelines, Recommendations, and Supporting Literature, AAHA Foundation, March 2003.

National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians

“There are no laboratory or epidemiologic data to support the annual or biennial administration of 3- year vaccines following the initial series.” ~Jenkins, S. R., Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control, 2003 Vet Med Today: Public Vet Med, JAVMA, Vol. 222, No 2, Jan 15, 2003

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Biologic & Therapeutic Agents, the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) as well as immunologists and clinicians at 22 veterinary schools in North America all err on the side of fewer vaccinations rather than more.

Click on the links below for complete details.


The American Animal Hospital Association, 2006 Vaccine Guidelines
Current guidelines regarding animal vaccines can be summed up in three words: few, infrequently or never.

AVMA Recommendations for Cat & Dog Vaccination
An update from the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) regarding the organization's recommendations for vaccines for cats and dogs.

The Report of the Vaccine-Associated Sarcoma Task Force
This report was published in the March 1, 2001 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association after an alarming increase in an aggressive cancer at vaccine injection sites in the early 1990s.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners
2006 Report of the American Association of Feline Practitioners and Academy of Feline Medicine Advisory Panel on Feline Vaccines The recommendations in this report are considered by many to be the veterinary standard of care for administration of feline vaccines.

Open Letter to DVM's From the Texas Veterinary Board of Medical Examiners

The Board encourages veterinarians to consider examining their long-standing vaccination protocols in light of our current knowledge of vaccinology. It urges veterinarians to address these considerations and discuss them with their clients in order to provide the best possible care for animal patients.



Sign the Petition to Grant Rabies Medical Exemption
for Sick and Senior Pets


Give responsible pet owners a reasonable way to obey the law and protect the health of our companion animals. Sign the petition.